Political Science

Specialisations

Study power and politics as they impact everyday lives in a top-ranked, selective programme.

Please note that besides the specialisations mentioned above, you can also opt for our Research Master.

It’s all about choice

Choice is at the very heart of politics. War or peace, left or right, liberty or security, sovereignty or integration, consensus or conflict—choices matter. Choice is also key to your education. Choose an intellectually challenging programme in which you develop your knowledge and expertise in the study of politics. If you wish, you can opt for an internship. And you can design your own thesis project, based on your own needs and interests. Choose a respected, selective programme that fits your future ambitions. Choose the MSc programme in Political Science at Leiden University.

By doing an MSc in Political Science in Leiden or The Hague, you will benefit from an advanced grounding in the fundamentals of political analysis and advanced training in essential academic and professional skills. There are six specialisations and two cities from which to choose:

In addition, we offer a two-year programme focusing on skill development and the ability to conduct independent research:

Why Political Science at Leiden University?

  • Leiden’s Institute of Political Science is one of the largest political science departments in Europe. It accommodates a wide range of (sub)disciplines and research interests.
  • Your lecturers are high ranking specialists in their field.
  • All courses are taught in small groups, allowing for personal contact with your fellow students, as well as your instructors.
  • The specialisations offer you a chance to explore topics in-depth that best suit your preferences.
  • Besides studying interesting themes, you will also familiarise yourself with the state-of-the-art in social and political science literature and research skills.
  • The city of Leiden is a popular student city, with attractive sights and a lively atmosphere. The city of The Hague harbours the main national political institutions of the Netherlands and many international organisations. Both propose a wide variety of cultural, sports and leisure activities.

Follow us

Website Institute of Political Science
Facebook
Twitter

Master details

  • Degree Master of Science in Political Science
  • Mode of study Full-time
  • Duration 1 year
  • Start date September, February
  • Language of instruction English
  • Location Leiden
  • Croho/isat code 60203

Like us on Facebook and stay tuned for updates. Please ask anything you would like to know about the Institute and the programme.

Dr. Danie Stockmann

“What is the chance that China will rise peacefully? And how likely is it that China will emerge as a major power internationally?”

“In the foreign press China is often portrayed as a rising super-power. Europeans and Americans alike are concerned about a possible military conflict that may come along with China’s rise. China, on the other hand, stresses its intention to cooperate with other nations peacefully and responsibly. What is the chance that China will rise peacefully? And how likely is it that China will emerge as a major power internationally?

In my research I am interested in China’s political transition and the impact of domestic developments, particularly regarding public opinion and media, on foreign politics. I have recently published a book entitled “Media Commercialization and Authoritarian Rule in China” (Cambridge University Press, 2013) which deals with the introduction of market forces into media and its impact on regime stability in China. In one-party regimes such as China, market-based media promote regime stability rather than destabilizing authoritarianism or bringing about democracy.

The themes conflict and cooperation lie at the heart of this argument. Recent anti-foreign protests in China illustrate these dynamics. As evident during the Senkaku / Diaoyu island disputes in the East China Sea, anti-foreign protests have been primarily directed against Japan,
but also the United States. In such periods of crisis, audience demands for criticism in the news overlap with a tough stance taken by the Chinese government regarding the foreign dispute. The absence of state restrictions and allowing media to freely follow market demands can produce highly negative reporting towards foreign countries, thus signaling to potential protesters that the government will not clamp down on protests. Yet at the same time, the government needs to avoid an escalation of protests, and after an initial period of openness it usually restricts strong criticism in the news, leading to tension between public officials and media staff. The capacity to deal with such conflicts and to use cooperative forces in Chinese society to its advantage remains key to the continuing rule of the Chinese Communist Party.”

Find your master's at Leiden University