Culture and Politics

Please note that this specialisation will start in September 2017.

In the Leiden University master’s specialisation in Culture and Politics you consider the cultural dynamics of power, dominance, and resistance, and more generally explore critical perspectives on the complexities of culture as an inextricable part of global politics.

Choose Culture and Politics at Leiden University:

  • Study the relationship between political concepts and a large variety of cultural forms.
  • Examine the transnational production, distribution, and consumption of culture, problematising “national” cultural and “soft power” policies.
  • Address phenomena such as emotion, subliminal representation, and transnational flow of cultural products and ideas in depth.

Check out the Culture and Politics programme.

Master details

  • This is a specialisation of: International Relations
  • Degree Master of Arts in International Relations
  • Mode of study Full-time
  • Duration 1 year
  • Start date September, February
  • Language of instruction English
  • Location Leiden
  • Croho/isat code 60734

A word from dr. A.M. O'Malley

“History is a crucial component of international studies. Every query about the nature and form of international relations begins with a solid understanding of the historical context of the question.

I am Assistant Professor of International Studies, teaching a range of courses on the history of international relations as part of the MA International Relations: International Studies programme. History is a crucial component of international studies. Every query about the nature and form of international relations begins with a solid understanding of the historical context of the question. It is particularly important for the International Studies programme given our innovative approach to international relations and the critical focus on non-Western approaches to international issues.

I teach specific electives on the History of the United Nations and 20th Century International Relations. Both of these classes encourage students to question interpretations of the past that have been inscribed into ideas and practices of international relations today. This process of challenging how we think about past events opens up questions about how international norms have been created and whether or not they are universally applicable within international society.

The primacy on the role of history also points to the interdisciplinary nature of International Studies. This a second core component of the programme. It is designed not just to teach students about international relations but highlights how history and political science can be combined to shed light on how the international order is structured and the means by which it can be changed. Working for such a forward thinking programme is a daily challenge in thinking about how international relations work and how to revise my own interpretations of historical events; an exciting and rewarding endeavour.”

Find your master's at Leiden University